Practice at Justice: Protests as Training Grounds

Written by Daniel Hudson //  In order to master a skill, we must first practice the rudimentary motions that comprise that skill. In the same way we must first practice at justice before we can enact (or practice) justice. I acknowledge that collective action in the form of rallies, protests, or marches can look very … Continue reading Practice at Justice: Protests as Training Grounds

Theme Overview: Race & Ethnicity- Division, Representation, & Hope

Charlottesville. Ferguson. #BlackLivesMatter. “No ban, no wall.” These are just a few of the places and names and phrases that surface in our social media feeds and headlines, highlighting the deep divides that exist in the United States of America and the reality that this “American melting pot” is also a place charged with tension … Continue reading Theme Overview: Race & Ethnicity- Division, Representation, & Hope

“Not Fit to Scoop Poop”: A Rallying Cry to Youth

Written by Katharina Depenthal & Madison Gent // Katharina: When I was 14 years old, I was extremely eager to go and volunteer at our local animal shelter.  My mother drove me over to go and inquire about their policy for teen volunteers.  Once I got there and asked the woman at the register about volunteering, … Continue reading “Not Fit to Scoop Poop”: A Rallying Cry to Youth

Amplifying the Embodied: The Necessity and Limitations of Social Media

Written by Erik Thone // “Social media engagement is not a substitute for but a supplement to traditional embodied practices of pursuing justice.” Tweet that. 118 characters. That’s my thesis statement. If you like—whether you continue reading or not—include the link to this article. In two minutes, you will have made an 800-word contribution to … Continue reading Amplifying the Embodied: The Necessity and Limitations of Social Media