When we talk about justice, we often emphasize the need for everyone to have a seat at the table, the resources they need, or a voice in the conversation. All of these things are particularly important to consider if we aim to make space for disabled or otherwise differently-abled individuals. What does justice mean for someone who has always faced obstacles that few others understand? How can we create communities that listen to the voices of those who live with disabilities? This fall, we sat down with Sarah Kenny, a speech pathologist in training, to talk about her work and how she sees it intersecting with justice. Disability and inclusivity are both complex topics; this month, we offer one example of work that helps people use their voices to advocate for themselves.  PC: Bram Janssens.

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