As countries and scientists scramble to protect the planet from unchecked greed and negligence, cries for social justice ring out in streets across the world. While it may seem these two battles are separate, those working in environmental fields know the impact that their work has on the peoples of the world and are striving to answer pressing questions. Does being stewards of the environment also benefit the most vulnerable among us? Can agriculture be made sustainable in the face of climate change and growing food demands? And can we cross the boundaries of tribe and nation to save our common home? Join the writers of this month’s theme as they explore what it means to use environmental work to practice love and justice.

final-grey Gretchen Rops evaluates how the agricultural practices she grew up with can be changed to promote justice.

final-grey Luke Overstreet joins Young Evangelicals for Climate Action and learns how to combine justice, faith, and environmental care.

final-grey Johanna Depenthal recounts how a British herpetologist and the people of Guyana joined forces to save sea turtles.

final-grey Rachel Lamb, a geographer working in climate policy, works to ensure all people in her state benefit from climate-saving policies.

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